Object name: ARP118

Designation(s): ARP118, NGC 1142, NGC1143,

Arp 118 reminds me a lot of Arp 244 also known as the Antenna Galaxies. Though there are no long tidal tails and only one of the galaxies is a spiral. This pair is nearly 4 times more distant at just under 400 million light years but the left spiral shows the same loop of knots along one edge that NGC 4038, the upper spiral in the antenna galaxies shows.

The left member of Arp 118 carries two NGC numbers 1141 and 1143. The right member also has two numbers 1142 and 1144. The reason for two entries for each is that NGC 1141 and 1142 were recorded by Albert Marth on October 5, 1864 but his position for them was off, putting both 40 minutes north of their correct position. Then on November 17, 1876 Édouard Stephan recorded them at their correct position. Dreyer, not realizing the error recorded both in his catalog that became the NGC. Since NGC 1143 and 1144 had the accurate positions they are usually used for this pair. I will use them as well.

NGC 1143 (right galaxy) is classed as S0 pec (Ring A) and NGC 1144 as S pec (Ring B). Arp though has them under his \"Elliptical or Elliptical-like Galaxies close to perturbing spirals\". I assume 1143 is the elliptical-like galaxy and 1144 the perturbing spiral. Though it appears to me its the \"perturbing spiral\" that has been most perturbed. Its arms are wildly distorted and then there\'s that blue arc of monster star clusters on the side toward the other galaxy.

There are two other possible members of this group but they appear to be staying just far enough away not to be distorted -- yet. One is LEDA 1150350 to the upper right of the other two. Just above NGC 1144 (left galaxy) is a near star-like blue galaxy SDSS J025512.06-001032.9 with a redshift distance that puts it at the same distance and thus likely a dwarf member of the group. While NED gives a separate positional galaxy entry for the blue arc most, including Arp, consider the arc part of NGC 1144. In fact, his comment on this entry reads: \"Arms and loops seem attracted to the E galaxy.\"

At the bottom of the image just slightly left of Arp 118 is a small spiral SDSS J025518.00-001824.7 with no distance data. Just to its right is a \"star\". It is listed as a galaxy ASK 037126.0 at a redshift distance of 1.63 billion light years. Obviously not a member of the group!

Toward the top of the page left of center is a galaxy with two faint loops for arms one above and one below the core. They must be due to some interaction in the past. It is LEDA 1154257 at about a half billion light-years. Too far to be involved with Arp 118. To its right and right against the upper edge is the spiral galaxy PGC 010988 540 million light years. These two may possibly have interacted in the past as both show some possible distortion.

There are two asteroids in the image as well though due to my processing to best show the structure of Arp 118 they are rather faintly seen. The one above Arp 118 halfway to the top and a bit right of the group is (42989) 1999 TO245 at magnitude 18.8 slightly further right but only slightly higher than Arp 118 is (47716) 2000 DQ25 at magnitude 19.6.

Arp\'s image is at:
http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/Arp/Figures/big_arp118.jpeg

14\" LX200R @ f/10, L=4x10\' RGB=2x10\'x3, STL-11000XM, Paramount ME