Object name: PERSEUS_CLUSTER

Designation(s): NGC1275, PERSEUS_CLUSTER,

The Perseus Galaxy Cluster is one of the richest nearby galaxy clusters known. It is about 240 million light-years distant and is the Abell 426 Galaxy Cluster. It consists of over 1000 galaxies. It is anchored by NGC 1275 a huge Narrow Line Radio Galaxy classified as a Peculiar cD/S0? galaxy due to all the emission line features it contains. This is because it really is two superimposed galaxies, one a dusty spiral seen against the massive elliptical galaxy. Since the elliptical is brighter than the spiral\'s arms they are seen as dark features against the spiral. Well, they are in better images than mine. Unfortunately, this is a very early image of mine when I was doing everything wrong in my beginner\'s ignorance. I really need to retake this one, something I keep saying but never seems to happen.

The annotated image only annotates NGC and a selected PGC galaxies out of 124 in the image with redshift data. I limited the annotation because finding places to put the annotation was difficult enough with the few I did include. Doesn\'t help that my ignorance results in the galaxy cores appearing saturated making seeing the labels impossible when they overwrite a galaxy or star. This was due to processing ignorance. I didn\'t reprocess it as the data is poor, to begin with. I suggest that you look elsewhere for images of this one. Below is a listing of the annotated galaxies from west to east (right to left) along with discovery data and an occasional comment.

NGC 1260 S0/a: discovered by Guillaume Bigourdan on October 19, 1884.
NGC 1264 SBa-b Discovered by Guillaume Bigourdan on October 19, 1884.
NGC 1267 E+ Discovered by Heinrich d\'Arrest on February 14, 1864 A star in our galaxy makes the core appear much brighter than it really is.
NGC 1268 SAB(rs)b: Discovered by Heinrich d\'Arrest on February 14, 1864.
NGC 1270 E Discovered by Heinrich d\'Arrest on February 14, 1864.
NGC 1271 SB0? Discovered by Guillaume Bigourdan on November 14, 1884.
NGC 1272 E+ Discovered by Heinrich d\'Arrest on February 14, 1884.
NGC 1273 SA(r)0^0^ Discovered by Heinrich d\'Arrest on February 14, 1884.
NGC 1274 E3 Discovered by Lawrence Parsons on December 4, 1875.
NGC 1275 Also known as Perseus A due to its strong radio emission cD/S0? Discovered by William Herschel on October 17, 1786 It isn\'t in either H400 observing program which surprised me.
NGC 1276 Is not in the annotated image as it is a pair of stars west and a bit north of NGC 1281 near the top of my frame. John Dreyer himself is responsible for this mistake on December 12, 1876.
NGC 1277 S0+ pec was discovered by Lawrence Parsons on December 4, 1875.
NGC 1278 E pec Heinrich d\'Arrest on February 14, 1884.
NGC 1279 S/S0? was discovered by John Dreyer on December 12, 1876. He got this one right.
NGC 1281 E5 Discovered by John Dreyer on December 12, 1876.
NGC 1282 E: Discovered by Guillaume Bigourdan on October 23, 1884
NGC 1283 E1 Discovered by Guillaume Bigourdan on October 23, 1884.

14\" LX200R @ f/10, L=6x5\' R=2x5\' G=3x5\'x3 B=2x7\', STL-11000XM, Paramount ME